Look who’s in the latest issue of Dogs Unleashed!

When National Dog Show representatives called us about featuring their event in the November/December issue of Dogs Unleashed magazine, how could we say no?

John O'Hurley graces the cover of the latest issue of Dogs Unleashed magazine.

John O’Hurley graces the cover of the latest issue of Dogs Unleashed magazine.

The annual dog show, sponsored by Purina, is held Nov. 16-17 and airs nationally on NBC on Thanksgiving Day, right after the Macy’s Thanksgiving parade. Millions of Americans tune in every year to the event, hosted by the Philadelphia Kennel Club.

And while the dogs are the stars of the show, it’s John O’Hurley’s job to keep viewers entertained throughout the broadcast. O’Hurley, perhaps best known for his role as Elaine’s boss J. Peterman on Seinfeld, has been with the National Dog Show since NBC started airing it in 2002.

His latest book, a children’s book called The Perfect Dog, is available for purchase just in time for Christmas. O’Hurley wrote the poem the book is based on for a video segment that aired during last year’s National Dog Show.

Dogs Unleashed caught up with O’Hurley via telephone from his home in California. We think you’ll be delighted with our feature on the man of many talents — actor, a best-selling author, composer and, of course, dog lover.  Check out the latest issue at dogsunleashedmag.com or CLICK HERE to subscribe to have Dogs Unleashed delivered to your home.

Bissell Pet Foundation, Animal Rescue Corps team up to help Gary, Indiana’s homeless pets

Thanks to the Bissell Pet Foundation and the Animal Rescue Corps, this dog was transferred from a run-down facility in Gary, Ind., to the Humane Society Calumet Area, where he has a chance for adoption.

Thanks to the Bissell Pet Foundation and the Animal Rescue Corps, this dog was transferred from a run-down facility in Gary, Ind., to the Humane Society Calumet Area, where he has a chance for adoption.

Anyone immersed in the animal rescue business has run across horror stories. Whether it involves hoarders, puppy mills or deplorable conditions in which animals are housed, the stories have come across our Facebook feeds, emails or word of mouth.

Many times, such stories have a happy ending. Such is the case with the City of Gary (Ind.) Animal Control Department. Thanks to the support of the Bissell Pet Foundation and Animal Rescue Corps, the animal control department in Gary recently partnered with the Humane Society Calumet Area to give the homeless animals in their city a second chance.

“The story really starts about a year ago, when we started receiving information about the shelter [in Gary] from different contacts in the area,” Veronica Dainelis, Bissell Pet Foundation coordinator, said. “We had heard the animals coming out of there weren’t in the best health and were really struggling. We investigated ourselves to see what was going on. The dogs were being kept outdoors … there was not much indoor protection, and they were in an old dilapidated building.”

The outdated record-keeping system in Gary made it difficult to get a handle on the shelter’s euthanasia rates, but Dainelis said the numbers were not good.

“But it’s easy to blame a shelter for having to euthanize animals when, really, there’s nothing they can do,” Dainelis said. “They take in an average of 1,600 animals a year and their maximum holding capacity is probably about 30 to 40 cages.”

This summer, BPF paid for Scotlund Haisley, president of Animal Rescue Corps, to go to Gary for a full assessment of the shelter and offer recommendations on how to improve the conditions.

“He said there’s not much we can do without closing the shelter down,” Dainelis said.

But Haisley did work to find solutions as well. He approached other facilities in the Gary area and found HSCA in Munster, about 15 miles from Gary, to be a progressive organization with resources to take in other animals.

With the help of BPF, Haisley and Animal Rescue Corps, a plan was presented to Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson and the city’s chief of police to have animals transferred to HSCA. In addition, animals picked up by Gary Animal Control would be taken to the Calumet facility, where there is adequate housing, proper veterinary care and behavioral modification programs. Instead of facing sure euthanasia in Gary, the animals will be put up for adoption at HSCA.

Freeman-Wilson agreed to the plan, and signed a contract with HSCA that runs through the end of 2014. Gary Animal Control will pay HSCA $50 per animal (feral cats are excluded) per month for its services, with an annual budget of $82,000.

The transfer of animals began in early October, and all are now housed at HSCA. The Gary Animal Control Department is still in operation, however.

“There still are animal control officers working for the city and doing the transporting,” Dainelis said. “They’re still patrolling, keeping the community safe and picking up stray animals.”

The difference is, those stray animals will be taken to the humane society, where they’ll have a second chance at life by being evaluated, cared for and put up for adoption.

And while some may balk at the fees the City of Gary is paying to save these animals, the alternative should be considered, Dainelis said. Building a new shelter in Gary isn’t a viable option, given the city’s budget. And besides the moral objections, euthanizing animals can be expensive.

“This definitely was the most economical option for them,” Dainelis said.” Euthanasia is expensive when you talk about everything that goes into it, including the removal of the animals. That’s where a lot of (Gary Animal Control’s) funding was going. Now, it will go to help keep the animals alive.

“It’s a much more positive outcome, the best option in many ways. The city wins and can run a more effective animal control department because they’re not trying to manage a shelter in addition, they’re not losing money, and the pets have a second chance.”

Dainelis said she hopes animal advocates in the area will still work to address the homeless pet population in the city. Ideally, a program to educate the community on responsible pet ownership, including spaying and neutering pets, would be put in place.

“We made recommendations about introducing humane education programs and safety net programs like spay/neuter, vaccinations and food to help keep pets in their homes in Gary,” she said. “It’s really a pets-for-life model. They don’t really have the resources, but there are rescue groups in the area that used to do a lot of rescue out of the shelter and I hope they might be able to do more safety-net type of programs.

“Now that the shelter animals are taken care of and we know they’re safe, it would be great if Gary could work at proactive means of limiting the amount of homeless pets. In turn, it will save them [money]. The less they’re taking in, the less they have to pay the humane society for taking them.”

Take time to consider the message of ArtPrize entry ‘Hope Dog’

If you live in West Michigan, you’re probably aware that the wildly popular ArtPrize gets under way next week, from Sept. 18 to Oct. 6.

The international art competition, featuring installations all over downtown Grand Rapids, is free and open to the public. In fact, the public is invited to participate by voting for their favorite pieces, and the top prize is $200,000. For all the information you’ll need on visiting the annual event, including a search function to find entries by artist name, subject matter or location, be sure to check out the ArtPrize website.

An up-close look at Hope Dog reveals it's made of thousands of photographs of dogs.

An up-close look at Hope Dog reveals it’s made of thousands of photographs of shelter dogs.

I ran into one entry this morning as I was delivering copies of Dogs Unleashed magazine, a publication of Pet Supplies Plus. I stopped in to the Riverview Center, an office building at Sixth and Front downtown, to distribute magazines to Tommy FitzGerald‘s restaurant, Cafe Stella.

The restaurant is located inside Riverview Center, and just outside the cafe is an ArtPrize entry called Hope Dog. (Yes, it’s already installed, but you can’t vote yet). I snapped a few photos of the piece, a sort of papier mache-like dog sculpture made up of a collage of black and white dog photos. It has faux fur for the ears and tails, and big brown eyes.

The statement from artist Mercedes Keller accompanies Hope Dog.

The statement from artist Mercedes Keller accompanies Hope Dog.

I also snapped a quick photo of the artist’s statement, figuring I’d take time to read it when I got home (yes, I was in a rush, as usual). I did read it when I got home, and it nearly brought me to tears.

While it may not win the grand prize, I applaud artist Mercedes Keller for her work and especially for her statement. I hope those visiting take the time to read it and feel the same emotions I did. At the very least, I hope all those viewing Hope Dog take time to think about the thousands of shelter pets at the same crossroads.

Hope dog 2

Hope Dog is roughly the size of a medium-sized dog.

Here’s the statement that accompanies Hope Dog:

I bark my greeting as I hear the familiar steps on the concrete floor. The man stops at my kennel and my tail wags in anticipation as he walks me down the rows of my comrades. I bark my goodbyes, feeling a little sad for those I’ve left behind. As I walk I dream of a life with a new home where I can run and smell all the old familiar smells and feel the love of a human again. A tinge of fear lingers as we approach the two doors. To the right, to the right, I plead silently. I remember the cries of anguish from the left door that came creeping out from beneath its darkened chambers. My feet buckle as I stare up, my eyes pleading to the man who now holds my future in his hands. We reach the crossroads …

Only we can write the end to stories like these, with passion, with knowledge, with HOPE.

Mercedes Keller

 

Mary Ullmer is editor of Dogs Unleashed, a lifestyle magazine for dog lovers. Contact her at info@dogsunleashedmag.com. To subscribe to Dogs Unleashed, visit dogsunleashedmag.com, and be sure to “like” Dogs Unleashed Magazine on Facebook.

Thanks to BISSELL Blocktail Party grant, WM Spay & Neuter Clinic reaches 7,000 surgeries

Congratulations to the West Michigan Spay & Neuter Clinic on performing its 7,000th spay/neuter last week! The clinic, located in Fruitport, opened its doors in October, 2010.

Jessie, a kitten found in a dumpster, became West Michigan Spay & Neuter Clinic's 7,000th patient thanks to a grant from the BISSELL Pet Foundation.

Jessie, a kitten found in a dumpster, became West Michigan Spay & Neuter Clinic’s 7,000th patient thanks to a grant from the BISSELL Pet Foundation.

The lucky No. 7,000 was a kitten named Jessie. Anne Munford, director of WMSNC, said Jessie and a littermate were found in a dumpster. The family that adopted Jessie brought her in to be spayed.

Munford was pleased to announce that Jessie’s surgery was only $25, thanks to a grant from the BISSELL Pet Foundation. BPF recently awarded its grants from the proceeds of its wildly popular BISSELL Blocktail Party, held each June.

The West Michigan Spay & Neuter Clinic received a $12,000 grant from BPF, allowing the clinic to continue offering affordable spay and neuter services.

BPF awarded grants to 16 West Michigan organizations to help fund programs that align with its four focus areas of adoption, spay/neuter, microchipping and foster care. This year’s Blocktail Party set a record with nearly $250,000 raised and 800 guests, many of whom brought along their dogs. Pet Supplies Plus, which publishes our Dogs Unleashed magazine, was proud to join forces with BPF as a sponsor for this year’s Blocktail Party.

“The BISSELL Pet Foundation exists to provide support to shelters and rescues so that they can ultimately find a loving family for the millions of homeless pets in our country,” Cathy Bissell, Founder of the BISSELL Pet Foundation, said in a press release. “We are very proud to support these 16 local organizations with funds from this year‟s party and have been thrilled to see how collaboration between many of these groups is changing the face of animal welfare in our community. I am so thankful that through the BISSELL Blocktail Party our community can show their support for these progressive and compassionate groups. Together, we are working to save lives!”

A breakdown of the BISSELL Blocktail Party grants awarded this year:

Congratulations to all the recipients who work incredibly hard to prevent pet overpopulation and to find homes for all the pets in our already overcrowded shelters and rescues.

Here’s hoping next year’s Blocktail Party, the ninth annual, sets yet another record in its fund-raising efforts to help these wonderful organizations.

 

 

The harsh reality of Detroit’s stray dog problem

This puppy is left chained to a porch railing for days. The owner has threatened anyone who tries to intervene or feed the puppy. A blue bowl next to the puppy is empty–no food or water. (Jennifer Waters photo)

This puppy is left chained to a porch railing for days. The owner has threatened anyone who tries to intervene or feed the puppy. A blue bowl next to the puppy is empty–no food or water. (Jennifer Waters photo)

The latest issues of Dogs Unleashed magazine includes a story many of us would just as soon not know about.

Unfortunately, the stray dog problem (and economic woes) in the city of Detroit are a reality we live with. Like any stories we see posted on Facebook of neglected and abused pets, of pets facing euthanasia in urgent need of adoption and of puppy mills and dog fighting, we would rather close our eyes and wish it away.

But these stories are out there, and they need to be told. Jennifer Waters, photographer for Dogs Unleashed magazine and owner of Grumpy Pups Pet Photography, went to Detroit to document first-hand the stray dog problem in the city, and the efforts of Detroit Dog Rescue to do what it can to help the situation.

You can read Jennifer’s full report in our September/October issue of Dogs Unleashed (subscribe for just $9.99 a year at dogsunleashedmag.com by clicking “subscribe” in the header, or pick up a copy at any of the six Pet Supplies Plus stores in West Michigan).

Jennifer also wrote a blog post on her experience, which you can read by clicking here. A word of warning: It is not a tail-wagging, happy experience. But it also is one to which we can turn a blind eye.

I encourage you to read the story, and the blog post, and share with others who need to know about the harsh realities facing dogs in Detroit these days.

Mary Ullmer is editor of Dogs Unleashed, a lifestyle magazine for dog lovers. Contact her at info@dogsunleashedmag.com. To subscribe to Dogs Unleashed, visit dogsunleashedmag.com, and be sure to “like” Dogs Unleashed Magazine on Facebook.

 

 

Stifling heat dangerous to our pets … know the warning signs

Baby, it’s hot out there! The Dog Days of Summer arrived a bit earlier than usual (that term is usually reserved for August), and much of the nation is sweltering these days.

I’m fortunate to work from home, where I can put our dogs in the air-conditioned house. Yes, they want to be outside, but it takes only a few minutes for them to realize perhaps indoors is the place for them. When they are out, we find the shady spots near our home and I make sure to fill up their kiddie pool with fresh cold water. So far, they’re surviving.

There also are products available, such as cooling pads and beds that sit up off the floor, to help keep our furry friends stay cool.

My friends at The Uncommon Dog sent along a cool infographic on recognizing heat stroke in our dogs. It’s especially important to keep our dogs cool in this 90-plus degree heat, with heat indexes hitting 100 in many parts of the country. Be sure to take a look, and take action if your dog is suffering from heat stroke (do not put your dog in an ice bath … use a cool damp towel to cool them instead!).

Thanks, Uncommon Dog, for the info, and stay cool!

PrintMary Ullmer is editor of Dogs Unleashed, a lifestyle magazine for dog lovers. Contact her at info@dogsunleashedmag.com. To subscribe to Dogs Unleashed, visit dogsunleashedmag.com, and be sure to “like” Dogs Unleashed Magazine on Facebook.

 

It’s hard to keep a good dog down — but it’s necessary after surgery

I’m sure every dog owner at one time or another has chuckled at the thought of keeping your dog “quiet” after some procedures at the veterinarian’s office. We’ve all seen it … our dog gets spayed or neutered and we’re instructed to keep them down for a few days.

We’re lucky if we make it through one full day without our pooch jumping on furniture, running in the yard, going up and down stairs. We reason that if the dog feels well enough to be doing those sorts of things, it must be OK.

Such is not the case with our corgi, Truman, who last week had surgery to repair a torn ACL in his rear left leg. He had been hurting for some time, to the point where he wasn’t using the leg. We waited to schedule surgery because a) it is summer, and we figured there was no way to keep him “quiet” and b) he was misdiagnosed by a different vet, who said it was simply a knot in his muscle that was preventing him from putting weight on the leg.

Harborfront Hospital for Animals staffer Molly Moore carried a very tired Truman out to the lobby after his stint in recovery following surgery.

Harborfront Hospital for Animals staffer Molly Moore carried a very tired Truman after surgery.

After a few months, we opted for a second opinion. Sure enough, X-rays revealed his ACL was torn. The literature we received from our new vet told us the sooner surgery is performed on this, the better. We felt horrible that months had gone by without us doing anything. In the meantime, arthritis had formed on Truman’s knee.

Truman had surgery last week, and we were given the “keep him quiet” instructions. But more than that, we were given more literature, which explained why, in this case, it is absolutely essential to follow the “keep him quiet” rule.

In essence, the literature explained that monofilament nylon strands were used to replace the damaged ACL. The strength of the nylon is temporary and would last about 10 weeks. In the meantime, the nylon acts to stabilize the knee while scar tissue builds up. It’s the scar tissue that will stabilize the knee in the long run.

Should the nylon strands stretch and slacken — from the dog being able to run about like normal — the scar tissue also will slacken and won’t stabilize the knee.

If that were to occur, the surgery would essentially be useless. Therefore, we’re sticking to our guns with Truman. As much as he wants to run and play (believe me, he’s ready to run), he can go outside only to relieve himself and must be on a short leash at all times outdoors.

Yes, it’s driving him crazy, especially with our other two dogs running around. And yes, we cheated a bit and set up his small X-pen so he can at least sit outside for a few minutes a day. We’re thankful for the hot humid weather, because he doesn’t mind being indoors in the air conditioning.

While Stuart, our Jack Russell, gets to roam free, Truman must remain confined.

While Stuart, our Jack Russell, gets to roam free, Truman must remain confined.

After four weeks of this, he will be allowed two five-minute walks a day in addition to his “potty” trips. He also will be able to swim for five minutes twice a day at this point, and I fully intend to take advantage of a good friend who said he’s welcome to her pool any time. I even bought him a little life vest with a handle on top to help him as he swims. He’s a good swimmer, but I don’t want to put too much strain on the leg.

I’m hopeful that, following these strict orders, Truman can regain the use of his leg for the most part. The literature also states that it may take as long as four to six months before we see “nearly normal” use of the leg, which is 85 to 95 percent. Since we waited so long to have the surgery done, I’d settle for 85 percent.

Now, we just have to continue to keep him “quiet.” It’s going to be a long summer.

 

Rescued Jack Russells arrive in West Michigan, prep for adoption

Crates of Jack Russells arrive via the ASPCA truck at Kent County Animal Shelter on Wednesday.

Crates of Jack Russells arrive via the ASPCA truck at Kent County Animal Shelter on Wednesday.

 

The Jack Russell terriers rescued from a suspected puppy mill operation in Lake City arrived at the Kent County Animal Shelter and Humane Society of West Michigan this afternoon.

The ASPCA’s Animal Cruelty Investigation Disaster Response truck pulled into KCAS around 1:30 p.m. and unloaded 15 Jack Russells. Six additional dogs, also JRTs, were then transported to HSWM. No Shiba Inus, also rescued from the puppy mill, were brought to West Michigan.

Dr. Laurie Wright, staff veterinarian at KCAS, said the dogs are in good shape, given what they’re going through. Some dogs had vomit and diarrhea in their travel crates and were given baths upon arrival.

“Most of the dogs are a little bit stressed because they’ve had a long car ride, but they’re really in pretty good physical condition,”  Wright said. “One I just processed had some evidence of flea dirt,  but no fleas. The ASPCA had already pretreated everybody, and  they’re all vaccinated heartworm tested, microchipped, fecal tested and dewormed, so we’re basically just getting them to the point where we can get them settled comfortably.

“They’ll get reassessed probably in the next 24 to 48 hours and we’ll see how they’re settling in. The bandanas you see us putting on them are sprayed with a pheromone to help calm them down. The bandanas aren’t just for cuteness, but also for de-stressing.”

Carly Luttmann, adoption program supervisor at KCAS, said the Jack Russells could be ready to be adopted as early as tomorrow.

“I think we need to do more behavior assessments on everybody tomorrow morning just to see how they’re going to fit in our adoption program, but I anticipate we’ll be ready to have them available,” Luttmann said.

The KCAS dogs all have familiar temporary names to anyone who follows the Detroit Tigers. They’re named after Tigers players and manager Jim Leyland.

“Our marketing and media manager, Lisa LaPlante, came up with Tigers’ players names,” Luttmann said. “It’s always a challenge to name a big group of dogs that comes in at once.”

Because there was just one male dog in the group of 15 at KCAS, Luttmann’s staff had to come up with solutions for the females.

“(The Tigers) have masculine names, so we had a to change a few things,” she said. “For instance, we changed Victor Martinez to Victoria M. We had to get a little creative.”

The dogs at HSWM will undergo behavioral testing before going up for adoption. Nicole Cook, marketing director at HSWM, said the dogs appear to have better temperaments than her staff expected, but they definitely are a bit fearful.

In addition, one HSWM dog is heartworm positive and another has a heart murmur. Cook said a grant from ASPCA will be used for medical treatment on those dogs, and said they should be fine with treatment. There’s no timetable for the adoption availability of the dogs in HSWM’s care.

 

 

 

 

 

Five more puppy mill dogs headed to West Michigan

I received word today that in addition to the 20 dogs slated to arrive at Kent County Animal Shelter,  five other dogs from the suspected puppy mill bust in Lake City, Mich., will be headed to the Humane Society of West Michigan.

Five dogs rescued from a suspected puppy mill in Lake City will arrive at Humane Society of West Michigan today, where they'll work with behavior specialists until they're ready for adoption. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter photo)

Five dogs rescued from a suspected puppy mill in Lake City will arrive at Humane Society of West Michigan today, where they’ll work with behavior specialists until they’re ready for adoption. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter photo)

A press release from HSWM said the five dogs are the last remaining from the more than 150 dogs seized and are the toughest to place, according to the ASPCA, because of their behavior challenges. The ASPCA worked in conjunction with law enforcement officials to find temporary shelter for the Jack Russell terriers and Shiba Inus rescued from the suspected puppy mill.

The HSWM release said the five dogs headed their way today are fearful and unsocialized and some suffer from medical issues, including heartworm and a heart murmur.

“We have a fantastic behavior specialist and veterinarian on staff who are ready and skilled to help in dire circumstances like this,” Trudy Ender, HSWM Executive Director, said in the release.  “We are pleased to be able to help these dogs and give them the care and attention they deserve.”

When the dogs arrive at HSWM, they will immediately get medical care and begin working with the behavior staff to acclimate them. The dogs will be evaluated upon arrival and will be placed up for adoption when they are ready for their new “forever” home, HSWM said.

Rescued Jack Russells, Shiba Inus will be available for adoption at Kent Co. Animal Shelter

More than 150 dogs, mostly Jack Russell terriers and Shiba Inus, were rescued from this outdoor kennel, a suspected puppy mill.

More than 150 dogs, mostly Jack Russell terriers and Shiba Inus, were rescued from this outdoor kennel, a suspected puppy mill.

You may have seen a story on the television news last week regarding the seizure of 150 dogs, mainly Jack Russell terriers and Shiba Inus, from a suspected puppy mill operation near Lake City, Mich.

Wednesday, 20 of those dogs will arrive at the Kent County Animal Shelter and will be available for adoption. And because of grants earlier this year from the Michigan Animal Welfare Fund and “George’s Fund,” KCAS will make available all the dogs  for a $50 adoption fee, plus the $12 to license them. The adoption fee covers spay/neuter, vaccinations and microchipping. Check out the “How to Adopt” section on the KCAS website to make sure you’re prepared when you visit the facility.

Animal Shelter Program Supervisor Carly Luttmann said the dogs should be arriving sometime before noon on Wednesday. They’ve already been evaluated for behavior and medical issues and will be immediately available. The dogs will need to be spayed or neutered before being released from KCAS, but that process shouldn’t take more than a few days, Luttmann said.

A Shiba Inu gets a medical evaluation after rescue. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter photo)

A Shiba Inu gets a medical evaluation after rescue. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter photo)

The dogs were taken from two locations: JRT John’s Jack Russell and Shiba Inu Kennel, as a result of civil action prompted by violation of Michigan’s Dog Law. The Missaukee County Sheriff’s office and the Roscommon County Animal Shelter led the way and called on the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) to help in the removal of the dogs.

The ASPCA said in a news release that the dogs were discovered living in outdoor enclosures with little protection from the elements. Many dogs had no access to clean drinking water or proper shelter, with plastic carriers being their only refuge from rain, snow or sun, the ASPCA said. Many of the dogs were unsocialized and fearful when handled by humans.

For that reason, Luttmann said those planning to adopt any of the dogs should realize that patience and training will be required. KCAS will offer information on Jack Russell and Shiba Inu breeds in addition to recommendations on training.

“We’re hoping people will come out (to KCAS) and help us find these dogs homes,” Luttmann said. “They lived in outdoor conditions at a puppy mill, so they might be shy at first and need training to adjust to their new lives. These Jack Russells are very smart, but they’re not all like the dog from ‘Fraiser.’ They will need training.”

A Jack Russell rescued from the suspected puppy mill who will be looking for a new home. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter  photo)

A Jack Russell rescued from the suspected puppy mill who will be looking for a new home. (Roscommon County Animal Shelter photo)

Luttmann added that the dogs may need dental work, not entirely uncommon for smaller breeds and terriers older than 2 or 3 who have never had dental care.

If you’re interested in taking advantage of the $50 adoption special and giving one of these dogs (or any other dog at KCAS) a loving home, be sure to stop by the animal shelter Wednesday afternoon or later.

The rest of the dogs seized are being housed at various locations, the ASPCA release said. They’ve undergone medical examinations and those that are medically and behaviorally sound, like those headed to Kent County, will be immediately placed by Roscommon County Animal Shelter with ASPCA response partners. Those response partners also include Medina County SPCA (Medina, Ohio) and Animal Humane Society (Golden Valley, Minn.), which are also supporting the sheltering operation and will help provide daily care for the animals.

Aside from KCAS, other agencies in Michigan assisting the operation include Michigan Humane Society (Bingham Farms), Kalkaska County Animal Control (Kalkaska) and Clare County Animal Shelter (Harrison).

“This case has been years in the making and we felt strongly that something had to be done to protect these animals,” Missaukee County sheriff Jim Bosscher said in the ASPCA release. “The ASPCA’s resources and sheltering knowledge, combined with the support of the Roscommon County Animal Shelter, will finally allow these dogs the chance to have a happy life.”