Dogs from neglect case available for adoption at Kent Co. shelter

The Kent County Animal Shelter has announced that 10 dogs taken in from a recent animal cruelty case in Grand Rapids are now ready and available for adoption.

Hundi is a 13-year-old Lab mix who has only three legs. She was saved from a neglect case in Grand Rapids and is now available for adoption.

Because the former owner pleaded guilty to animal cruelty and thus forfeited ownership, KCAS (with the help of Mackenzie’s Animal Sanctuary) was able to save and rehabilitate the dogs, many of whom were underweight, injured and suffering from signs of neglect.

The dogs include two Chihuahuas, two German shepherd mixes, three Doberman pinschers, two Lab/border collie mixes and one long-haired mixed breed dog.  Ages range from 2 years to 13 years old, according to Lisa LaPlante, marketing and communications manager for the Kent County Health Department.

Hundi, a 13-year-old Lab mix, is among the dogs rescued from the animal cruelty case. She is a special case in that she has only three legs. One of her hind legs was amputated previously, LaPlante said in a news release, in an incident unrelated to the neglect situation.

The release said Kent County Animal Control Officers had worked with the former owner for several months, asking her to improve the living conditions for these dogs. In November,  according to LaPlante, it became apparent that KCAS needed to intervene.

The former owner was charged in November with animal cruelty, punishable by up to a year in jail, and failure to license a dog. The guilty plea to the cruelty charge dropped the second charge. The former owner is scheduled to be sentenced next month, the release said.

KCAS took control of the dogs in November. Mackenzie’s assisted, taking in five of the dogs for a week.

Anyone interested in adopting one of the dogs, or any dog at KCAS, can visit the shelter at 740 Fuller NE in Grand Rapids. Thanks to a grant from the BISSELL Pet Foundation, dog adoptions through the end of the year are just $82 and include spay/neuter, all vaccinations, microchip and licensing for 2013.

The Kent County Animal Shelter is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. KCAS will be closed Christmas eve and Christmas day a well as New Year’s day.

 

BISSELL Blocktail Party grants announced: $163,650 shared by recipients

A  whole lot of dogs and cats, and those who care about their well being, are a whole lot happier today. Eleven animal welfare organizations in the Greater Grand Rapids area received word on their BISSELL Blocktail Grant applications, and the dollar amounts they’ll receive are staggering.

Daisy the dachshund was the 2011 “Blockstar” and attended this year’s BISSELL Blocktail Party as well. (Photo/Yvonne Reames)

This year’s BISSELL Blocktail Party, held on June 13 at Mangiamo!, set a record by raising $187,000. More than 800 people attended Blocktail, another record. Proceeds from the event ($163,650 after expenses) benefited the BISSELL Pet Foundation, which then distributed the money to the organizations applying for grants. Included in the event’s expenses were the $1,000 donations made to each of 10 Blocktail “party partners” before the event even took place.

Many of the groups receiving grants couldn’t dream of raising the amount they received from BPF in a single fundraiser. The BISSELL Pet Foundation should be applauded for coming to the aid of these hard-working organizations who are on the front lines fighting pet overpopulation and promoting pet adoption through shelters and rescues.

“The West Michigan community never fails to stand behind a great cause, and this event shows that we believe pets are important, too,” Cathy Bissell, event co-chair and founder of the BISSELL Pet Foundation, said in a news release announcing the final dollar amounts.  “The community really pulled together to make this our best year yet.  We are overwhelmed with appreciation from the outpouring of support.  Every year, local sponsors and donors help to make this a unique event, and this year was no different.  We’re so thankful for everyone’s generosity.”

The Kent County Animal Shelter received a whopping $41,000 grant, while C-SNIP, which offers low-cost spaying and neutering services, received $30,000.

“It’s exicitng to be recognized by BISSELL as the solution to pet overpopulation,” said Pat Schoen, executive director of C-SNIP.  “They’re the first local corporation that has really stepped up to the challenge and has recognized those organizations that are addressing pet overpopulation and adoptions.”

Schoen said $15,000 of C-SNIP’s grant will go toward her organization’s BISSELL Big Paws Fund, which will help offset the cost of spay/neuter surgery for dogs 60 pounds or more. Another $10,000 will go to the community spay/neuter assistance fund for smaller dogs and cats, and the remaining $5,000 will assist rescue organizations who bring dogs and cats to C-SNIP for spay/neuter services.

Schoen said now that C-SNIP has some funding, the challenge is to get people through their doors.

“Today, we had seven no-shows with dogs and 10 no-shows with cats,” she said Monday. “That’s 17 people who had appointments today that didn’t show up. We run on a 12 percent no-show rate. We have the money, now it’s a matter of getting clients in.”

Here’s the breakdown of all 11 BISSELL Blocktail grant recipients and the amount they received, according to BISSELL’s news release:

Kent County Animal Shelter received $41,000 to support their adoption efforts through the upcoming ASPCA and Rachel Ray $100K Challenge that takes place from August to October.  In addition, the grant money will be used to help with spay/neuter costs for stray pets that are being reclaimed by their owners.

Community Spay Neuter Initiative Partnership (C-SNIP) received $30,000 to fund programs aimed at subsidizing sterilization surgeries for low-income families and local rescue groups.

Vicky’s Pet Connection was awarded $27,000 to initiate a community microchip and ID tag program and help support programs that provide care and treatment to “at-risk” animals that are rescued from local shelters.

Humane Society of West Michigan received $21,600 to fund monthly adoption promotions, including subsidies to support low-cost adoption of senior pets, and to support their live-saving efforts with animal transfer and microchipping.

Carol’s Ferals was granted $12,000 to support their TNR (trap-neuter-return) program for feral cat populations and to provide appropriate equipment needed to care for their adoptable cats.

Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary received $10,000 to support their Humane Education and Adoption Programs and to provide food and supplies for cats in their care.

Mackenzie’s Foundation received $10,000 to purchase needed equipment for a planned on-site veterinary clinic.

Safe Haven Humane Society was awarded $5,000 to create a dog training program for their adopters and to support a free spay/neuter program for female cats and their litters.

Reuben’s Room Cat Rescue received $4,000 to provide care and treatment for cats in their care, with funds targeted to supporting the special needs of senior cats.

Bellwether Harbor was given $2,050 in needed funding to help advance their microchipping program.

MidAmerica Border Collie Rescue received $1,000 to purchase a requested microchip kit and additional microchips for adoptable pets in their care.

Congratulations to all the organizations and a big thank you for all they do for animals.